US Army Corps of Engineers
New England District

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Project Partnership Agreements

The Corps’ Continuing Authorities Program (CAP) is a group of nine legislative authorities under which the Corps of Engineers can plan, design, and implement certain types of water resources projects without additional project specific congressional authorization. The purpose of the CAP is to plan and implement projects of limited size, cost, scope, and complexity. Project Partnership Agreements for CAP and Specifically Authorized Projects are below:
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Section 103 of the 1962 River and Harbor Act authorizes the Corps of Engineers to study, design, and construct small coastal storm damage reduction projects in partnership with non-Federal government agencies, such as cities, counties, special authorities, or units of state government. The maximum Federal cost for planning, design, and construction of any one project is $5,000,000. Each project must be economically justified, environmentally sound, and technically feasible. Hurricane and storm damage reduction projects are not limited to any particular type of improvement. Beach nourishment (structural) and floodproofing (non-structural) are examples of storm damage reduction projects constructed utilizing the Section 103 authority.

Section 107 of the River and Harbor Act of 1960 provides authority for the Corps of Engineers to improve navigation including dredging of channels, anchorage areas, and turning basins and construction of breakwaters, jetties and groins, through a partnership with non-Federal government sponsor such as cities, counties, special chartered authorities (such as port authorities), or units of state government. The maximum Federal cost for project development and construction of any one project is $10,000,000 and each project must be economically justified, environmentally sound, and technically feasible.

Section 204 of the Water Resources Development Act of 1992 provides authority for the Corps of Engineers to plan, design and build projects to protect, restore and create aquatic and ecologically related habitats in connection with dredging of authorized Federal navigation projects. Typically, these projects involve the beneficial use of dredged material from navigation channels to improve or create wetlands or waterbird nesting habitats. The maximum Federal cost for planning, design, and construction of any one project is $10,000,000.

Section 205 of the 1948 Flood Control Act authorizes the Corps of Engineers to study, design, and construct small flood control projects in partnership with non-Federal government agencies, such as cities, counties, special authorities, or units of state government. The maximum Federal cost for planning, design, and construction of any one project is $10,000,000. Each project must be economically justified, environmentally sound, and technically feasible. Flood control projects are not limited to any particular type of improvement. Levee and channel modifications are examples of flood control projects constructed utilizing the Section 205 authority.

Under the authority provided by Section 206 of the Water Resources Development Act of 1996, the Corps may plan, design and build projects to restore aquatic ecosystems for fish and wildlife. Projects conducted in New England under this program have included eelgrass restoration, salt marsh and salt pond restoration, freshwater wetland restoration, anadromous fish passage and dam removal, river restoration, and nesting bird island restoration. Projects must be in the public interest and cost effective and are limited to $10,000,000 in Federal cost.

Updated July 10, 2019

Under the authority provided by Section 1135 of the Water Resources Development Act of 1986, the Corps may plan, design and build modifications to existing Corps projects, or areas degraded by Corps projects, to restore aquatic habitats for fish and wildlife. Projects conducted in New England under this program have included salt marsh and salt pond restoration, estuary restoration, freshwater wetland restoration, anadromous fish passage, and river restoration. Projects must be in the public interest and cost effective and are limited to $10,000,000 in Federal cost.