New England News Releases

City of New Haven seeks USACE permit for proposed work in waters of New Haven Harbor
2/27/2024
 The U.S. Army Corps of Engineers, New England District received a permit application to conduct work in waters of the United States from the City of New Haven Engineering Department for proposed work...
USACE seeks comments on proposed work in Prospect Reservoir in Prospect, Connecticut
2/27/2024
 The U.S. Army Corps of Engineers, New England District received a permit application to conduct work in waters of the United States from the South-Central Connecticut Regional Water Authority for...
Town of Temple seeks permit for proposed work in Henry Mitchell Brook off Mitchell Brook Road in Maine
2/15/2024
The U.S. Army Corps of Engineers, New England District received a permit application to conduct work in waters of the United States from the Town of Temple for proposed work in Henry Mitchell Brook...

Top Rotator

Local bird watchers descended upon West Hill Dam armed with pen, paper and a few binoculars to participate in West Hill Dam’s annual Backyard Bird Count.
Construction of the System Management Engineering Facility (SMEF), the 40,000 square foot, 2-story addition, is well underway and progressing rapidly.
For vessels wanting to enter Plymouth waters, dredging to remove shoals from the Plymouth Harbor federal navigation project in Massachusetts is currently underway and on schedule.

News From Around the Corps

Louisville District engineer champions STEM education and diversity to inspire future generations
2/29/2024
The U.S. Army Corps of Engineers Louisville District’s Army and Interagency and International Support (IIS) Section Chief, Stacey Purifoy-Jones, is passionate about inspiring future generations to...
ERDC leadership, researchers celebrate National Engineer’s Week with community outreach
2/26/2024
The U.S. Army Engineer Research and Development Center (ERDC) has its eyes on the future. In honor of National Engineer's Week, ERDC leadership and STEM professionals ventured into the community to...
ERDC associate technical director earns Black Engineer of the Year Award
2/23/2024
Victoria “Vickey” Moore is the associate technical director of the Engineered Resilient Systems Research and Development Area in the Information Technology Lab (ITL). Moore was recently chosen to...

Feature Stories

Cape Cod Canal Dredging and Town Neck beach sand placement complete

USACE, New England District
Published Feb. 2, 2016
As the hydraulic dredge operates in the distance, clean sand is deposited onto Town Neck Beach in Sandwich, Massachusetts.

As the hydraulic dredge operates in the distance, clean sand is deposited onto Town Neck Beach in Sandwich, Massachusetts.

Great Lakes Dredge and Dock's dredge navigates the Cape Cod Canal.

Great Lakes Dredge and Dock's dredge navigates the Cape Cod Canal.

The contractor's hydraulic dredge operating in the canal.

The contractor's hydraulic dredge operating in the canal.

The maintenance and advance maintenance dredging of the Cape Cod Canal and the sand placement onto Town Neck Beach in Sandwich, Massachusetts is complete.  Work on the project concluded on Jan. 20.

Approximately 130,000 cubic yards of sand was dredged from six areas in the authorized, 32-foot-deep by 500-foot-wide main ship channel and the 25-foot deep East Mooring Basin portions of the Canal.  “Shoaling in the main ship channel consists of large wave formations,” said Project Manager Bill Kavanaugh.  “These formations cause draft restrictions, tidal delays and hazardous conditions for deep-draft commercial vessels transiting the canal.”

The Cape Cod Canal is a toll-free, open-to-all waterway that connects Buzzards Bay and Cape Cod Bay. The project is used by both commercial and recreational vessels and eliminates the need to transit around Cape Cod, a distance of approximately 135 miles and a more hazardous route.

The District’s contractor, Great Lakes Dredge and Dock Company, LLC of Oak Brook, Illinois, used the Dodge Island, a hydraulic hopper dredge with pump out capability and ancillary equipment necessary for direct beach placement of the dredged material.  The Contractor pumped the material directly on the 2,500-foot-long eroded section of Town Neck Beach. 

Originally scheduled to take 2-3 months to complete, the entire dredging and sand placement only took two and a half weeks.  In addition to adding sand to the beach, New England District and its contractor are also going to add dune grass plantings.  “Great Lakes has the planting on the schedule to begin late January and going into February,” said Kavanaugh.  “It should take a month to complete, but that is very dependent on weather conditions.  Work must be completed by the end of March.”

The sand was placed just prior to Winter Storm Jonas hitting the Cape on Jan. 23.  Early indications are that the sand held well during the storm. The town of Sandwich provided $2,957,900 in funding to place the sandy material directly onto the beach and for dune grass plantings

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