New England News Releases

City of New Haven seeks USACE permit for proposed work in waters of New Haven Harbor
2/27/2024
 The U.S. Army Corps of Engineers, New England District received a permit application to conduct work in waters of the United States from the City of New Haven Engineering Department for proposed work...
USACE seeks comments on proposed work in Prospect Reservoir in Prospect, Connecticut
2/27/2024
 The U.S. Army Corps of Engineers, New England District received a permit application to conduct work in waters of the United States from the South-Central Connecticut Regional Water Authority for...
Town of Temple seeks permit for proposed work in Henry Mitchell Brook off Mitchell Brook Road in Maine
2/15/2024
The U.S. Army Corps of Engineers, New England District received a permit application to conduct work in waters of the United States from the Town of Temple for proposed work in Henry Mitchell Brook...

Top Rotator

Local bird watchers descended upon West Hill Dam armed with pen, paper and a few binoculars to participate in West Hill Dam’s annual Backyard Bird Count.
Construction of the System Management Engineering Facility (SMEF), the 40,000 square foot, 2-story addition, is well underway and progressing rapidly.
For vessels wanting to enter Plymouth waters, dredging to remove shoals from the Plymouth Harbor federal navigation project in Massachusetts is currently underway and on schedule.

News From Around the Corps

USACE's ERDC and SWG Team Up To Provide Important Federal Acquisitions Training To Joint Audience
2/21/2024 UPDATED
The U.S. Army Corps of Engineers (USACE), Galveston District (SWG), hosted PROSPECT (Proponent-Sponsored Engineer Corps Training) Course 183, Formal Source Selection, at the Jadwin Building in...
Seeking Water Resources Center (WRC) Director GS-15 – Apply by 1 March 2024
2/22/2024 UPDATED
Exciting Opportunity! IWR is hiring a new WRC Director (Interdisciplinary GS-15)! Are you ready to lead this diverse, multi-disciplinary Center to solve USACE’s water resources challenges by analyzing...
Park Ranger Christine Dowell named Mobile District’s NRM Employee of the Year
2/7/2024
U.S. Army Corps of Engineers Park Ranger Christine Dowell of the West Point Project has been named the Mobile District’s Natural Resources Management Employee of the Year for her outstanding service...

Feature Stories

New England District team observes Native American Heritage

U.S. Army Corps of Engineers, New England District
Published Dec. 30, 2014
Keynote speaker Shelley Lowe addresses the audience during the Native American Heritage Month observance in the New England District Theatre in Concord Park, Concord, Mass., on November 4, 2014.

Keynote speaker Shelley Lowe addresses the audience during the Native American Heritage Month observance in the New England District Theatre in Concord Park, Concord, Mass., on November 4, 2014.

Lt. Col. Charles Gray presents keynote speaker Shelly Lowe with a Bunker Hill certificate during the Native American Heritage Month observance in the New England District Theatre in Concord Park, Concord, Mass., on November 4, 2014.

Lt. Col. Charles Gray presents keynote speaker Shelly Lowe with a Bunker Hill certificate during the Native American Heritage Month observance in the New England District Theatre in Concord Park, Concord, Mass., on November 4, 2014.

Shelly Lowe, Executive Director of the Harvard University Native American Program, visited the New England District to serve as keynote speaker at the Equal Employment Opportunity's Native American Heritage Month event. Lowe’s presentation, held in the Concord Park theater, was titled, “Native Americans in Higher Education.”

The keynote speaker began by talking about values that are found in the Native American culture. “Identity and location matter,” she said. “Difference is not a problem. Education is important. Our history and future are equally important.”

According to Lowe, Native Americans are diverse. They are practitioners and scholars that fill multiple roles. “We are dedicated to access and success,” she said. “We want indigenous epistemology and methodology.”

Lowe talked about the invisibility of Native Americans in the higher education system. “One percent of total college students enrolled are Native American,” she said. “In the fall of 2009, 0.5-percent of full-time college faculty identified themselves as Native Americans and only 0.3-percent were at full professor level.”

Continual crises that the Native American Community addresses include student retention, loss of language, culture and tribal knowledge, poverty and historical trauma. Lowe said that Tribal colleges and universities, first established in 1968, are starting to offer Bachelor of Arts and Bachelor of Science degrees to Native American students. According to Lowe, the Tribal colleges and universities currently offer community centers and active memorandums of understanding and transfer programs with non-indigenous institutions. “University cultural spaces provide a place to be and student support,” she said. “They maintain community and cultural health and provide history and sense of belonging.”

Lowe concluded the Nov. 4 presentation by challenging the audience to get to know indigenous communities and increase a Native American presence in the District. Lt. Col. Charles Gray, Deputy Commander, New England District, presented Lowe with a Bunker Hill plaque for coming to speak with the District team.

Prior to her work at Harvard, Lowe was an Assistant Dean at Yale University. She is an enrolled member of the Navajo Nation and grew up on the Navajo Reservation in Gando, Arizona. 

Lowe has served on the board of the National Indian Education Association and as a trustee on the Board for the National Indian Education Association.


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